Application of the Syllk model wiring an organisation for the capability of an online Community of Practice

VINE JIKMS – 2016

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems
Application of the Syllk model wiring an organisation for the capability of an online Community of Practice

Stephen Mark Duffield , (2016),”Application of the Syllk model wiring an organisation for the capability of an online Community of Practice”, VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, Vol. 46 Iss 2 pp. –

dx.doi.org/10.1108/VJIKMS-09-2015-0052

Structured Abstract:
Purpose – To demonstrate how to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned knowledge (Syllk) model to enable the organisation for the capability of an online Community of Practice (CoP).
Design/methodology/approach – The research method consisted of multiple spiral ‘action research’ cycles (plan, action, observe and reflect) within a government organisation. The initial planning stage consisted of interviews followed by two focus groups to identify the facilitators and barriers that impact the initial design of the Syllk model within the organisation. Established knowledge management practices were aligned with each of the Syllk elements to address the identified barriers and facilitate learning as the action cycles progressed. Online CoP initiatives were implemented with two action research cycles completed. Actions were observed, monitored, evaluated and reflected on using an after action review process.
Findings – The results from this research shows how the capability of a CoP can be ‘wired’ (distributed) across organisational systems, and how the Syllk model can be used to conceptually facilitate this. The research highlights the importance in understanding organisational knowledge facilitators and barriers and the associated practices to reflect and learn from past experiences.
Research limitations/implications – The paper demonstrates an application of the Syllk model, and that action research can benefit project and knowledge management researchers and practitioners.
Practical implications – This study contributes to practice by highlighting how to use the Syllk model to ‘wire’ an organisation for some know-how capability.
Originality/value – This study applies a conceptual model enabling management to understand how organisational know-how is distributed (wired) across various systems of an organisation for an online CoP.
Keywords: Knowledge management; Communities of Practice; Lessons learned; Organisational learning; Project learning; Swiss cheese model; Action research

Article Classification: Research paper


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How to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model to wire an organisation for the capability of storytelling

How to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model to wire an organisation for the capability of storytelling

Abstract

This study is an application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model that enables management to conceptualise how organisational know-how for storytelling is wired (distributed) across various elements of an organisation. The research method consisted of action research cycles within a large division of a government organisation. Storytelling interventions and initiatives were implemented with two action research cycles completed. Actions and changes were observed, monitored, evaluated, and reflected on using an after action review process. This study has established that the alignment of the people and system elements (learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure) can positively influence an organisation’s capability for storytelling, and therefore learn lessons from stories of past project experiences.

Keywords – Project Management; Knowledge Management; Storytelling; Lessons Learned; Organisational Learning; Action Research

syllk st

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026378631500188X

Enjoy…If you don’t have access to IJPM, please contact me for an earlier proof version that can be shared.

Until next time, Stephen


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How to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model to wire an organisation for the capability of storytelling

Paper recently accepted in the International Journal for Project Management.

Abstract

This study is an application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model that enables management to conceptualise how organisational know-how for storytelling is wired (distributed) across various elements of an organisation. The research method consisted of action research cycles within a large division of a government organisation. Storytelling interventions and initiatives were implemented with two action research cycles completed. Actions and changes were observed, monitored, evaluated, and reflected on using an after action review process. This study has established that the alignment of the people and system elements (learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure) can positively influence an organisation’s capability for storytelling, and therefore learn lessons from stories of past project experiences.

Keywords – Project Management; Knowledge Management; Storytelling; Lessons Learned; Organisational Learning; Action Research

syllk st

A link will be provided when the proof is available.

Stephen Duffield
Jon Whitty


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Powering up your capability with the Syllk model

To make a great cup of coffee, there are six elements that must all be in balance;
learning (staff skills and expertise)
culture (values and beliefs)
social (relationships between staff and other)
technology (artefacts, tools, equipment and IT systems)
process (routines, practices and tasks)
infrastructure (physical facilities and spaces).

If just one of these elements is out of balance, the capability of the café to make a consistently great cup of coffee will be compromised. Just think what would happen if the café didn’t have the right sort of coffee machine (technology) or what if the Barista didn’t particularly like coffee or care how it tastes (culture)?
We can we use this simple lesson in coffee making to improve the capabilities of our whole organisation.

Enjoy the clip, until next time… Stephen


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ISO 9001:2015 > A lessons learned game changer for the application of the #Syllk model

Up until now knowledge management and lessons learned have typically been highlighted in project management bodies of knowledge (PMBoK, APM Knowledge, PRINCE2, ISO21500 etc).

Very soon (~end of 2015) we will see the release of ISO 9001:2015 ‘the world’s leading quality management standard‘. There is a new clause on organizational knowledge as a new requirement:

7.1.6 Organizational Knowledge Requirements:

• Determine the knowledge necessary for the operation of processes and to achieve conformity of products and services.
• Maintain this knowledge and make it available to the extent necessary.
• Consider current knowledge and determine how to acquire or access the necessary additional knowledge (when addressing changing needs and trends).
• NOTE 1: Organizational knowledge can include information such as intellectual property and lessons learned.
• NOTE 2: To obtain the knowledge required, consider: a) Internal Sources (e.g., learning from failures and successful projects, capturing undocumented knowledge and experience of topical experts within the organization); b) External Sources (e.g., standards, academia, conferences, gathering knowledge with customers or providers).

“Knowledge” is defined in the terms section as the available collection of information being a justified belief and having a high certainty to be true.

When addressing changing needs and trends, the organization shall consider its current knowledge and determine how to acquire or access the necessary additional knowledge…Understanding, Knowledge,and Awareness of ISO 9001:2015 Dr Nigel H Croft Chair, ISO/TC176/SC2 (Quality Systems). …remember Deming – “There is no substitute for profound knowledge of the business”

A new opportunity for organizations to be wired for knowledge using the #Syllk model.

Duffield_GraphicalAbstract_V0.01

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Until next time…

Stephen


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AIPM Conference 2015 update

I will be presenting the Syllk model at the 2015 AIPM conference. Looking forward to sharing with the PM Community. More updates to follow…

Application of a Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge Model for Organisational Learning through Projects

Abstract

A significant challenge for organisations is to ensure that lessons are learned and that mistakes of the past are not repeated. Both the knowledge and project management literature suggests that the lessons learned process in practice rarely happens, and when it does it is usually concerned with lessons identification rather than organisational learning taking place. It appears that there are limited models for management to use to conceptualise what organisational learning is and therefore how to enable it. This paper describes how a Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model (a variation of the Swiss cheese model) can enable project organisations to conceptualise how they can learn from past project experiences and distribute successful project know-how across an organisational network of elements such as learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure.

Keywords: Project Management; Knowledge Management; Lessons Learned; Organisational Learning, Action Research, Syllk model

 

 


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KMAus 2015: Application of a Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge Model for Organisational Learning Through Projects #SYLLK #KMAUS

H099 KM Aus 468 60In practice organisational learning from projects rarely happens, and when it does it often fails to deliver the intended results. Learn how to use the Syllk model (a variation of Reason’s Swiss cheese) to wire an organisation for the capability of learning through projects.

Audience Participation: Identify facilitators & barriers to Knowledge Management (Lessons Learned) and associated KM practices with a follow up discussion at the World Cafe.

• Organisations are failing to learn from their past experiences
• The Swiss cheese model is successful at promoting safety and accident prevention
• We adapt the Syllk model for organisations to learn from past experiences

What The Delegates Will Take Away from the Session:
• Gain an understanding of the facilitators and barriers to knowledge management lessons
learned.
• Enable management to conceptualise how learning know-how is distributed across a
network of interconnected organisational faculties and systems.

Looking forward to meeting up with as many of my pmlessonslearned blog followers as possible.

Until next time…Stephen

#SYLLK #KMAUS

H099KMAUS125


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